Current projects

Alternatives to Violence (AVP)

Alternatives to Violence (AVP)

In Russia, as in other societies, there is a great need for training in alternatives to violence. When he spoke about Friends House Moscow at Yearly Meeting Gathering 2009, Sergei Nikitin, Director of the Amnesty office in Russia, showed two telling pictures....

Conscientious objection

Friends House Moscow supports A'ternativshchik , the newsletter giving information about alternative civil service. We also support the Video Activist project in Kazan, which provides film screenings and a forum for discussing them.
Work with disadvantaged children and young people

Work with disadvantaged children and young people

Big Change Big Change helps young people aged 18-30 who have come out of orphanages to get into college, university or a profession. Many have mental health problems or learning difficulties. Many realise the need for qualifications only after they...
Work with refugees

Work with refugees

Editor's note: This article appeared in 2010.  More up to date news about the Centre can be found in our Winter newsletter, 2016 We are working with the Centre for the Adaptation and Training of Refugee Children to help the children of migrants ...
Foster Parent Training

Foster Parent Training

Training for Foster Parents: a visit to the project Training for Foster Parents is a new project which Friends House Moscow is able to fund as a consequence of a grant from the Radley Trust. This is a path-finding project because fostering did not...

Social Work in Russia

Here are two interesting articles about social work in Russia, describing the similarities and differences from practices in the UK. These help in understanding the context in which FHM projects operate. The articles first appeared in the January and August 2011 issues of Professional Social Work, available to subscribers on www.basw.co.uk.

“Adopting a New Path” is written by FHM Board President Daphne Sanders, and describes her experience of social work, fostering and adoption in the city of Dzerzhinsk.  In “Growing up in Russia”, Sue Kent reports from the national Congress of Russian Social Work held in Moscow in October 2010.