“Christ in Catastrophe” – A Review

Christ in Catastrophe Pendle Hill
The Russian Journal, a daily Russian internet journal which reports thoughtfully on politics and culture, has reviewed Friends House Moscow’s translation of Emil Fuch’s essay Christ in Catastrophe.

Fuchs, a pacifist and a Friend, survived life in Hitler’s Germany without losing his faith. Interesting, that the Russian reviewer singles out a passage in which Fuchs comments that as long as our faith is only an intellectual one, as long as we spend our active lives seeking wealth and status, we will live enslaved.

FHM’s translation of the book was publicised at baznica.info, a popular protestant website in Russian.

Below is an English translation of the review by Lynn Mae and Brian Spooner.  The original review, in Russian, can be read here:

http://russ.ru/Mirovaya-povestka/V-seti-poyavilsya-perevod-knigi-Emilya-Fuksa-Hristos-v-tragicheskie-vremena

A translation of Emil Fuchs’ “Christ in tragic times” now available on the web

On the bookshelf

Fuchs in 1912 with his wife and three oldest children

Fuchs in 1912 with his wife and three oldest children

Emil Fuchs was born in Germany in 1874. A Lutheran pastor, in 1925 he became a member of the Society of Friends (Quakers), and in 1931 Professor of Religious Studies at Teachers College in Kiel, where he was subsequently fired when the Nazi party came to power.

As early as the First World War, Emil Fuchs was a convinced pacifist. After the seizure of power by Hitler, he was sentenced to 10 months in prison for “anti-government propaganda.” Later, while under surveillance by the Gestapo, he participated in an organization that assisted persecuted people fleeing Nazi Germany.

For Emil Fuchs, and for many, it was a period of terror and suffering. He lost his wife and daughter, and his surviving children, who inherited their father’s views, were in danger. His youngest son Klaus was forced into hiding, fearing the actions of student vigilantes against his active anti-fascist views. However Emil could not only keep the faith, but also found in his faith support and answers to those questions people often ask themselves in moments of despair:

Emil Fuchs in 1952

Emil Fuchs in 1952

God allowed this to happen? How can one look forward to life after what happened? Is there something to live for now?

Emil Fuchs’ book “Christ in tragic times,” written in 1949 – a short “guide to action”, concerns true values, about how to be a Christian and to survive in the face of terrible events, about humility and love.

Fuchs talks about his religious experiences, and returns to the Gospel and speaks of the challenge posed by man – to manage to preserve a pure heart, to seek peace, to oppose violence and not compromise his conscience: “As long as our faith is only an intellectual one, as long as we spend our active lives seeking wealth and status, we will live enslaved.”

Book originally published by “Pendle Hill Publications” in Pennsylvania, USA. Russian translation edited by Vitaly Adamenko, Sergei Grushko and Natalia Zhuravenkova available electronically.

 

 

Leave a Reply

  

  

  

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>